Flinging Away The Crutch

I recently made a big decision: to stop taking antidepressants. I have been on medication for most of the past 14 years — continuously for the past 11 — and they have helped me a lot. They have been a vital tool in helping me change from someone so controlled by her anxiety and depression that she rarely left the house to someone who actually has a life. I just don’t feel that I need to take them anymore.

Deciding to take or not to take antidepressants is a a personal choice.

I have read a lot of people’s opinions on antidepressants, ranging from those who think they are evil and that the side effects are worse than the illness they treat, to those who advocate taking as large a dose as possible for as long as possible. In my experience, neither of these extremes are true or helpful. Antidepressants don’t work for everyone and even when they do, it can take a lot of experimentation to find the correct type and dosage for you.

I decided to take antidepressants in the first place because my doctor thought they would help me and I was desperate to grasp at anything which might make my life more bearable. Too many people judge others’ decisions to start or continue taking antidepressants; whereas nobody judges people for relying on medication to treat physical illness, even when that illness could theoretically be controlled through other means, a lot of people feel the need to voice their (often misinformed) opinions on antidepressants. Perhaps it would have been “better” for me to have used other methods of managing my mental health, but these simply weren’t available to me when I was at my lowest points. Medication was available and I’m very grateful.

I should stress that I am in regular contact with my doctor and reduced my antidepressant dosage according to his advice before stopping completely. This was important to prevent withdrawal symptoms, but it also enabled me to gauge whether my symptoms worsened as the dose decreased. They did not, so I decided that coming off medication was the right choice for me.

One of the key reasons that I am able to cope nowadays is because antidepressants helped me access and implement other ways of managing my mental health. When my mental illness was at its worst, I simply couldn’t do things like taking regular exercise and using CBT techniques to challenge my negative beliefs. Antidepressants were the crutch which allowed me to take steps forward.

It’s scary, but I have contingency plans — including going back on antidepressants if needed.

I will never be anti-medication, as much as I advocate using other therapies and activities to manage mental health, and I will take antidepressants again if required. I know that I have to monitor my mental health so that I can observe and address any changes — I still have mental health problems and they will never magically disappear. I hope to manage my mental health well enough that I can be considered “recovered” in the future, but I’m taking things one step at a time.

I know that my progress won’t be linear. Everyone has good days and bad days in terms of mood and mental health, regardless of whether they have ever been mentally ill, and recovery from physical illnesses and injuries os rarely straightforward. I think it’s important for me to keep this in mind. While I’m confident in my decision, the uncertainty still terrifies me. I don’t know what will happen — whether there will be a dramatic deterioration or improvement in my mental health or, as I suspect is more likely, whether things will change gradually.

So being congratulated for coming off medication is tricky.

For one thing, I don’t know whether I will have to take antidepressants again in the future. I feel unable to claim this as an unmitigated success because I have no idea if the change is permanent. I’m happy to be able to try life without medication, but it feels like being congratulated for starting to learn to drive — it’s a step in the right direction, but I don’t know whether it will turn out well.

The thornier issue is that congratulations imply that you have achieved something through hard work and while I have worked hard to control my mental illness, I was struggling a lot more when I was on antidepressants. I worked hard even when there were no positive results. It comes back to the idea of being judged for taking medication: congratulating me now implies that I was doing something wrong because I needed to take antidepressants. That makes me uncomfortable because it’s not true — needing medication doesn’t mean you are weak or a failure. Regardless of how you choose to treat mental illness, battling it takes courage and strength every day.

More than anything, I’m curious about the future — and a bit excited!

I have no idea whether I have suffered side effects from my medication for a start, though I have my suspicions. I don’t know precisely how much my antidepressants helped me, or in which situations, so I don’t know how (or if) anything will change. I never felt that the medication blotted out my personality — though my mental illness did — but I have no idea whether it affected certain behaviours or personality traits. I can’t wait to find out what life without antidepressants is like.

Having said that, coming off medication is just one of the changes I have made this year and my curiosity and excitement about the future owe more to these other changes. I may be taking tentative steps now I have flung my crutch away, but hopefully I will be skipping ahead someday soon.

 

 

.