Prepare to Talk

Buy Diazepam Next Day Review I’m writing this post because to tomorrow is Time to Talk Day and while I think it’s a great way to raise awareness about mental health issues, we also need to acknowledge that talking can be difficult. Some of the comments I have read on social media point out that trying to talk is not always a positive experience. It’s sad and infuriating, but true. With this in mind, here are my tips for preparing to talk about mental health…

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1. Decide on your aims before you start the conversation.

Order Adipex P 37.5Mg What do you hope to get out of talking? Help and support from a particular person? More understanding in general?

What do you want to talk about? There are many topics within the broad subject of mental health. Picking one or two will help you steer the conversation.

http://bethhamiltonphoto.com/2012/09/25/kendall-jarrette-wedding-pinecrest-baptist-ambassador-club-of-portsmouth/ Often, conversations will go in a different direction to what you anticipated, but having a clear set of aims and objectives in your mind will help you to start talking. It’s also helpful to use your aims as focal points, so you can return to them if the conversation starts turning in a direction you find uncomfortable.

Buy Clonazepam 2Mg Deciding on your aims needn’t be complicated: you can stick to one simple aim. 

Buy Diazepam Actavis Here are some examples:

Order Phentermine 37.5 From Canada • To let my friend know I struggle with anxiety

Buy Ambien With Mastercard • To tell my colleagues that having time off for depression doesn’t mean I’m lazy

• To ask my mum to help me get counselling

http://littlemountainproject.com/tag/major-projects-group/  

2. Prepare for unexpected outcomes — positive and negative.

Buy Pex 2 Alprazolam Some people may not respond to your conversation in the way you would like. There are loads of reasons for this: some people refuse to acknowledge mental illness out of fear or ignorance, some avoid talking about mental health because they have their own issues and are uncomfortable discussing them and other people will have a million other reasons.

http://littlemountainproject.com/tag/public-hearings The best way you can prepare for the unexpected is to try not to take anyone’s response personally. If someone refuses to listen, it says more about them than it does about you.

Buy Ambien Without I know that’s easier said than done, but try to decide on an action plan in advance. How will you react if the person says something offensive? Or if they just aren’t interested? Put your needs first — it’s fine to walk away.

Buy Diazepam Powder China Time to Talk Day isn’t about being a martyr; it’s about starting the conversation. It’s not your fault if others don’t want to participate and you don’t need to “fight for the cause” by trying to extend the conversation when you might as well be talking to a brick wall.

http://thesoussegroup.com/category/blog/general-real-estate-news/page/5/ It also helps to prepare for positive responses. I’m always delighted when my openness persuades other people to talk about their mental health issues, but it can be challenging when you don’t know what to say. As a minimum, tell people to go to their local GP if they have any concerns. This is the best initial course of action overall, so try not to put them off by sharing any negative experiences about seeking help.

http://wherewaterfalls.com/bizarre-mesmerizing-carnivorous-plants/ It can also be helpful to point people in the direction of some good websites if they want to more information or support. Here are a few of my top recommendations:

http://kokannews.org/?p=1636 Mind

http://aquobex.com/news/news/2014-03-04-household-flood-insurance Samaritans

Buy Real Alprazolam Young Minds

http://kurtlancaster.com/20/10/2010/dslr-cinema-book-from-focal-press/feed  

3. Feel proud of yourself.

Speaking out is hard. It’s brave. Starting a conversation about mental health is an achievement — even if it doesn’t turn out how you wanted.

You might feel discouraged by a negative experience, but please keep on trying. The negative experiences are symptoms of why we need to talk and keep talking: there is still a lot of stigma, ignorance and apathy in the world.

If your experience is positive, please share it with others. It can be a flickering light in the darkness to people who have lost hope and think have nobody to talk to.

Also remember that there are plenty of ways to “talk” so you can join in even if you feel uncomfortable talking in person. Blogs and social media are a great way to start “talking”.

Keep starting conversations and we will break down the stigma — one talk at a time. Good luck!

Turning Points

I have been thinking about turning points a lot lately — blame the new year! Everyone seems to be talking about their goals or how they have already broken their resolutions. I like talking about goals and how to achieve them, but so much of the discussion is polarising: people tend to be either super-motivated, insisting we can all transform our lives in a millisecond, or pessimistic and resigned to never being able to change. It’s frustrating, because the healthiest attitude, especially for those of us with mental health issues, falls between these black and white views.

Signpost

Turning points are decisions.

Whether you are trying to change your life or your day, getting the desired outcome starts with making a decision. The decision doesn’t guarantee a certain consequence, but it does mean there is a chance of success. It’s more effective than waiting for things to change on their own.

For example, if you are having a bad day and feeling more depressed than usual, you have a choice. You can wait and see how the day plays out, whether something will happen to improve your mood. Or you can decide to do something which might improve your mood.

What you do will vary, depending on your current abilities and access to activities. You might feel better if you could jet off to somewhere sunny, but that isn’t an option for most people — even if you have the money, work and other commitments get in the way. Going for a walk is one of my go-to options, but sometimes anxiety prevents me from going out. Watching a favourite film or TV programme is a good option for accessibility — though others include reading, listening to music and baking.

Order Real Adipex You might feel no better after trying to change things, but the point is you tried — you took action instead of passively waiting and reacting to anything which happens.

 

How to create a turning point.

http://valliscommodities.com/ar/location/united-arab-emirates/ 1. Decide what you want. What are your current goals? This could be something you have always wanted to do in life or simply changing the course of this week. It doesn’t matter — as long as it’s something you want.

http://thesoussegroup.com/financial-update-by-maurice-sousse-35 2. Brainstorm ways to achieve what you want. Include everything which comes to mind, even if it seems stupid. If you get stuck, research ways other people have achieved similar goals.

Buy Soma Online Us To Us 3. Evaluate your options. Are they healthy? Realistic? Accessible? What would you need to fulfil each course of action? Don’t dismiss something just because it will be difficult, especially if it’s something you really want, but be aware of potential pitfalls.

4. Pick a course of action. Decide what to do and consider the steps involved. Your course of action may be single, consisting of a single step, or it could be complex. Again, research any aspects of your plan which you don’t know how to go about — fill in the blanks.

5. Take the first step. This is your turning point. No matter how small it seems, it could make a difference to you. Whatever the outcome, be proud of yourself.

 

Cheap Roche Valium Keep creating new turning points.

Improving your situation in the long term involves consistency and persistence. Success is more likely if you stick to your course of action and keep going. However, there will be setbacks and pitfalls. You will mess up. You will stray from the path you have chosen.

Diazepam Order Lorazepam If this happens, don’t beat yourself up; just create a new turning point. No matter how many times you fail or let yourself down, you can always decide to change. Point yourself in the right direction, take the first step and don’t turn back.

Self-Caring

I find winter very difficult, so I was fascinated to read an article by Hannah Davies in the February issue of Psychologies magazine in which she discusses her mission to learn to love January. She says that January has now overtaken May as her favourite month, I don’t think I will ever love January more than spring or summer, but I do think it’s a great idea to appreciate the good things about winter. And yes, they are there — if you look hard enough!

Winter tree

One of the things Davies mentions in her article is the intricacy of bare tree branches. That image stuck with me, so when I walked up the lane to my favourite tree yesterday, I took this photo. She’s right — there is a lot of beauty in the stark patterns created by the branches and I have never taken the time to appreciate it before now.

http://kurtlancaster.com/23/12/2010/magic-lantern-for-rebel-t2i550d-yes/ Finding beauty in each day is also a great way to practice mindfulness. It’s difficult to seek out the little details when your mind is full of chatter.

Thinking about finding the beauty in every day, even in winter, made me think about self-care. I recently read The Self-Care Project by Jayne Hardy, which is a very good book with loads of practical information and exercises to work through. Jayne Hardy created The Blurt Foundation and I received the book in December’s Buddybox (which is a great way to practice self-care and support The Blurt Foundation). One of its messages has stuck with me: what does self-care mean for me, right now?

So, what does self-care mean for me at this moment?

It means working towards my goals, but also finding pleasure in the here and now. Appreciating the fact that I walk my dog on my own most days, which I simply wasn’t able to do 2 years ago. Enjoying reading ghost stories when I’m snuggled up in bed. Managing my mental health through exercise. Choosing to eat soup and porridge instead of crisps and cake for meals. And yes, looking forward to the longer, lighter days of spring!

 

Upgrading, Not Transforming

Happy new year! I’m sorry I haven’t blogged for ages. My depression got worse before Christmas and once I was feeling better, I had a lot of work and studying with which I needed to catch up. It’s been difficult, but the worst is over and I feel better for the days getting (gradually) longer and lighter.

I find it interesting that everyone seems to be divided at the start of a new year: they either buy into the “new year, new you” thing or rail against it. Personally, I believe both approaches have their benefits and a moderate approach is best. You are perfectly good as you are and self-acceptance is important, but there is a lot of value in setting and working towards goals.

Lorazepam Buy I have a list of things I would like to achieve this year, but I’m also trying to appreciate my life as it is.

I have a lot of things to be grateful for, not least of which is having the opportunity to achieve (what I considered to be) a major life goal last year. I also feel I belong in my own life more, which is hard to explain. I suppose it’s about feeling as though I am doing meaningful things and contributing to the world in my own small way.

 

My approach: upgrading

I have been frustrated in the past (the recent past, too) that achieving a big goal hasn’t totally transformed my life. I know it was unrealistic to have those expectations, but I’m human and I tend to think “I would be so much happier and more successful if only I could do X.” I *think* I have finally learnt that while certain accomplishments or experiences may change my life, this is most likely to happen gradually rather than overnight.

Take trekking to Machu Picchu, for instance. I didn’t quite believe I could do it, right up to the point that I arrived at the Sun Gate, but I had all these assumptions about what it would mean if I did reach my goal. I thought I would be fearless, confident, unstoppable. I thought I would be able to change my life within weeks of returning home. I thought it would change me.

http://linenbeauty.com/7-ways-to-celebrate-the-coming-of-spring And it has changed me, but not as much or as quickly as I had hoped. I am more confident, although I still struggle at certain and in certain situations. I know I’m capable of committing to a huge goal and achieving it. Even of 99% of what I attempt results in failure, I know success is possible.

I alluded to the biggest change in my life in the openings paragraph of this post — my trek inspired me to embark on a Psychology BSc with the Open University. I have no idea what impact it will have on my life, but I know it’s a step in the right direction. I will probably be able to join the dots only in hindsight, several years or more down the line. All I know is that studying is the right thing for me to do for now and it will provide me with more opportunities.

I have decided to view changes like my Psychology course as upgrades. They haven’t transformed my life, but they have set me on a path which may lead to transformation.

I have also decided to view my goals for 2018 as upgrades. Achieving all of my goals may not change my life a great deal, certainly not on a daily basis, but my life will improve. I hope to end this year fitter, healthier and with better finances. I probably won’t be able to solve the major problems in my life (poor mental health, a lot of debt, living with my parents), but I can make improvements.

 

Focusing on the process

A major lesson which life has taught me over and over again is that I can’t control the results of anything — I can only control what I do. I find this easier to accept in some areas of my life more than others.

Submitting short stories, for example. I know I can’t control whether my story will win a prize or get published; all I can to is submit it to the competition or literary journal. However, I got very frustrated when obstacles threatened my Machu Picchu trek. It was annoying, being on a once-in-a-lifetime challenge and struggling with altitude sickness, panic attacks and a throat infection. It wasn’t fair. But every time I started thinking about the unfairness, I had a panic attack. This made my situation worse. The only way I could make progress was to focus on the process, putting one foot in front of the other without thinking about how hard it was or how much further I had to go.

So my goals for 2018 are all about focusing on the process. I won’t bore you by listing them, but suffice to say that they are all within my control and achieving them should be possible as long as I focus on execution and not results.

Getting caught up in results often harms execution. For instance, if your goal is to lose weight and you have a specific time frame in mind, it can be demotivating when you have a disappointing week. You convince yourself you’re off track, even if you have been following your eating and exercise plan. You might wonder why you bother and get sucked into a downward spiral, comfort eating so much that you jeopardise the next week’s weight loss. Chances are your disappointing weigh-in was down to normal weight fluctuation, but focusing on it and losing sight of the process can turn a blip into an abandoned goal.

http://skillofstrength.com/2017/10/11/the-evaluation-never-ends/fullsizerender-3/ Focusing on the process doesn’t mean you ignore the results: it’s about giving the process a fair shot before you change or abandon it. 

The type of results for which you are aiming also bear consideration. How much are they within your control? Weight loss, for example, is within the control of most of us. While you may have medical conditions which make it harder to lose weight, it’s possible for most people (with some exceptions; I’m not denying that). You may have to tackle psychological issues and/or physical problems along the way, but you can do it. Other results are almost completely outside your control: winning a Nobel Prize or getting married to a celebrity you fancy, for example. These are not good goals, because you will be setting yourself up for disappointment (again, with a few exceptions).

 

Prioritising a healthy attitude

The biggest problem for me is that working towards goals can trigger my mental health problems. Facing a setback can exacerbate my depression and/or anxiety. I can quickly convince myself that I’m doomed to failure and might as well give up.

Buy Clonazepam Online Usa Conversely, working towards goals also has a positive impact on my mental health. It gives my life meaning and purpose. It bolsters my self-esteem and helps me develop resilience. 

Bearing this in mind, I have to be careful about how I approach goals. I need to keep a sense of perspective and remind myself of the progress I have already made, both towards a particular goal and in other areas of my life. I know my red flags — becoming obsessed about a goal, letting a goal affect my mood — so when my attitude is becoming unhealthy, I can stop and remind myself of what is most important in my life, i.e. maintaining the optimal level of mental health I can at any time.

I like using charts to measure my progress, especially those that focus on the process. For example, ticking or colouring in a box every time I go for a run or put £5 in my savings account. Having a visual representation of my progress helps me to keep perspective. Plus there’s something really satisfying about ticking or colouring a box!

 

Will you join me?

I believe setting goals is a (note: not http://drumcommodities.com/ the) key to a healthy and fulfilling life. I get sick of all the “new year, new you” stuff, especially when I see adverts claiming that losing weight will have magical effects on your life (I lost a lot of weight in the past and it didn’t make me happier or more successful and though I was physically healthier, my mental health was worse). However, I also know that almost everything I like about my life has been created through setting goals. Even when I haven’t achieved a goal, I have learnt from the process and often made progress.

So I encourage you to set healthy, exciting goals which will lead you closer to your ideal life.You might want to change your life completely, but change starts with improving the areas of your life which matter most to you. These small improvements snowball over time and lead to you doing things you never believed possible.

Buy Phentermine 15Mg Go for it. You can make your life a little better. You might transform your life this year, but you might not — and that’s okay. Good luck!