BPD Stigma

Alprazolam .25 Mg Buy I was recently upset and appalled by an article in the August 2018 issue of Psychologies magazine, which I previously respected and have found useful in the past, referring to people who have borderline personality disorder as “energy vampires”. I have written to the editor, explaining how the article perpetuates stigma and thought other people might be interested in what I have to say. The article refers to a book by Christiane Northrup which I have not read (and have no intention of reading if it has been accurately represented), but my main concern is with what Psychologies actually approved and published.

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http://wherewaterfalls.com/wp-content/plugins/maxbuttons/js/min/front.js?ver=7.1 Dear Suzy,

Cheap Valium From India I am writing in response to the “How to avoid the energy vampires” article featured in the August 2018 issue of Psychologies magazine. The opening paragraph states: “When I use the term ‘energy vampire’, I’m talking about a subgroup of people — about one in five of us — who, in psychiatry, are called Cluster B personalities, with narcissistic, borderline, histrionic and antisocial personality disorders., and there’s a spectrum; you can certainly live with someone who’s a little self-centred and has narcissistic traits and then, at the other end, there are full-blown psychopaths.”

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This email shall discuss borderline personality disorder (BPD), simply because I don’t feel qualified to comment on the other conditions mentioned. I have personal experience of BPD, having been diagnosed in November 2010, at the age of 26.

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Labelling people with a mental illness — which includes BPD — is always harmful and increases stigma. To label us “energy vampires” is offensive. While the article mentions a spectrum, it uses the term “energy vampire” to refer to all people in that spectrum, including all people who have BPD. I can’t imagine that this paragraph would be accepted if, instead of referring to personality disorders, it had referred to depression, anxiety (both of which I also have been diagnosed with) or a physical illness.

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http://thesoussegroup.com/financial-update-by-maurice-sousse-3/ Unfortunately, some mental illnesses continue to receive a disproportionate amount of stigma, stereotyping and discrimination compared to other mental illnesses. BPD is a key example and part of the problem is that it’s misunderstood, rarely being mentioned in mainstream media. On the rare occasions it is mentioned, such as in this article, it’s usually in negative terms.

Buy Soma From Trusted Pharmacy The extent of this stigma can be seen across the internet and social media. Whenever Mind or Time to Change publish a blog post written by someone who has BPD, there are inevitably Facebook comments which perpetuate the negative stereotypes and stigma. These comments usually say that people with BPD are a nightmare to live with, difficult to interact with and generally not worthy of good relationships. Because BPD has not received the same amount of positive publicity as other mental health issues, people cling to the old stereotype as portrayed in Fatal Attraction. Yes, the most common impression people have of BPD is garnered from a 30 year old, misogynistic film!

http://kurtlancaster.com/26/07/2010/adapting-redrocks-microshouldermount-to-dslr-configuration/zacuto_striker/undefined?1541365581306 Given this background, it should be obvious that labelling people with BPD as “energy vampires” feeds into the existing stigma.

http://kurtlancaster.com/28/07/2010/composition-in-philip-blooms-2-nights-in-mallory-square/bloom_2_nights_2/ I appreciate the apology you gave on Twitter and welcome any efforts to educate the general public abot BPD. There is a lot of ignorance and lack of understanding surrounding BPD, so positive representations would go a long way in addressing the damage caused by negative depictions and references. Many of us make positive contributions to our friends, families, communities and societies, but this is rarely mentioned in mainstream publications such as Psychologies.

If people with BPD are difficult to deal with, it’s because they are not receiving adequate treatment, help and support. This article makes no mention of this, simply terming all sufferers “energy vampires” who have a negative effect on the people around them.

Get Ambien From Doctor Ironically, I had bought the magazine because I was interested in the “restore your energy” dossier and as BPD makes me incredibly sensitive to other people’s moods, I identify more as an “empath” than an “energy vampire”.

Lorazepam Buy Canada I would like to see Psychologies increase understanding of BPD. The negative stereotype is ridiculous considering the range of symptoms which can be experienced: individuals who have BPD may seem complete opposites. For example, both promiscuity and withdrawing from romantic relationships can be symptoms. Of course, the name itself is difficult for the general public to understand, with its connotations of character defects — many people assume BPD means “bad personality”. A lot of people I encounter don’t even realise BPD is a mental illness.

http://thesoussegroup.com/cpw-featured-21-gramercy-406/ Please show that people with BPD are worthy of love and respect. We are capable of maintaining good relationships and contributing to other people’s lives in positive ways.

Buy Legit Valium Online For example, I volunteer with a local youth mental health organisation. Last year, I ran a crowdfunding campaign which secured £15,000 to save our peer support groups in one particular town, which had been threatened with closure. In May last year, I completed a four day trek to Machu Picchu and raised over £1000 for Amnesty International, despite having panic attacks throughout the final morning of the trek. I blog about my mental health in an attempt to inspire other people with mental health issues to achieve their goals.

http://bethhamiltonphoto.com/how-did-i-do-.html However, my own contributions are very small compared to a lot of people who have BPD. On Twitter, I see amazing examples of activism and personal achievements. People who are amazing parents, partners and professionals. Yet I never see them mentioned elsewhere.

Buy Soma Next Day I hope this email has explained why many of us with BPD find the article offensive and worry about its potentially damaging effects.

Kind Regards,
Hayley

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Buy Adipex P Online Uk Update: Psychologies magazine’s editor, Suzy Walker, has emailed me to take full responsibility and says that she is taking steps to ensure this doesn’t happen again and to promote understanding of BPD. She also invited me to blog about BPD on the magazine’s Life Labs website: click here.

Buy Soma Online Usa I am impressed with Suzy’s response and optimistic that this mistake will lead to positive outcomes which will reduce the stigma surrounding BPD.

http://thesoussegroup.com/category/blog/feed/ .