3 Things I Wish Everyone Knew About Mental Health

It’s Time to Talk day so instead of advising how to talk about your mental illness or telling you what to never say, I thought I’d do some talking! If everyone knew just these 3 things about mental health, I believe my life and many other people’s lives would be much easier.

1. Everyone has mental health.

A lot of people assume mental health is irrelevant to them because they have never been diagnosed with a mental illness, but this isn’t true. Just as everyone has a level of physical health, everyone has a level of mental health. You don’t need to have mental illness to experience fluctuations in your mental health — in fact, fluctuations are normal.

Given this, everyone should be aware of their mental health. Awareness can help you find ways to feel better when your mood dips and means you can recognise mental health problems much sooner. Recognising and treating mental illness as soon as possible saves a lot of pain.

Part of Resurfacing and Rewriting’s mission is to get people talking about their mental health in the same way they talk about physical health. You don’t need a diagnosis to be part of the conversation.

 

2. Mental illness doesn’t define you.

Nobody is defined by their mental illness. It may alter your perspective on life, but it doesn’t negate the other aspects of your life. During bad episodes, it may feel like your life and personality have been obliterated by mental illness, but it can only hide most aspects of your life — not destroy them.

Mental illness affects people’s identities in different ways, but it doesn’t constitute an identity in itself. In fact, mental illness can have a positive impact on identity — you may see yourself as a survivor and mental health activist. You may become a mental health blogger and hope to help others with mental health problems…

 

3. Mental illness can affect anyone.

People who have never experienced mental health problems love to believe the myths: that mental illness only affects the weak or bad people, that people somehow cause their own mental illnesses, that you can only get mentally ill if it’s already in your family. They love to believe these myths because if they were true, it means mental illness could never happen to them. They think they can stave off mental illness through being strong, good people who take responsibility for themselves. Of course, it’s all bullshit.

Anyone can get mentally ill at any time. Mental health problems don’t discriminate — they affect rich and poor, successful and unsuccessful, pretty and ugly, all ages and ethnicities. Some of these factors may make you more likely to experience mental illness, but mental health problems are prevalent throughout all of society. You can try to avoid mental illness by taking action to promote good mental health, such as exercising regularly and building good relationships, but there are no guarantees. You can do everything “right” and still become mentally ill.

 

If everyone knew just these 3 things about mental health, it would make a big difference. Get talking!

 

 

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